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CDC standards for Child
Children and adolescents should do 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of physical activity each day.

Encourage your child to participate in activities that are age-appropriate, enjoyable and offer variety! Just make sure your child or adolescent is doing three types of physical activity:

What do you mean by "age-appropriate" activities?
Some physical activity is better-suited for children than adolescents. For example, children do not usually need formal muscle-strengthening programs, such as lifting weights. Younger children usually strengthen their muscles when they do gymnastics, play on a jungle gym or climb trees. As children grow older and become adolescents, they may start structured weight programs. For example, they may do these types of programs along with their football or basketball team practice.

To get you started, here is a list of possible activities that children and adolescents can do to meet the Guidelines. These activities serve as a guide, so encourage your child to do any of them, as long as they are age-appropriate.
Many of these activities fall under two or three different categories, making it possible for your child do each type of activity – vigorous-intensity aerobic, muscle- and bone-strengthening activity – on at least 3 days each week. Also, some activities, such as bicycling or basketball, can be done at either a moderate- or a vigorous-intensity, depending on your child's level of effort.
  Age Group
Type of Physical Activity Children Adolescents
Moderate–intensity aerobic
  • Active recreation such as hiking, skateboarding, rollerblading
  • Bicycle riding
  • Walking to school
  • Active recreation, such as canoeing, hiking, cross-country skiing, skateboarding, rollerblading
  • Brisk walking
  • Bicycle riding (stationary or road bike)
  • House and yard work such as sweeping or pushing a lawn mower
  • Playing games that require catching and throwing, such as baseball, softball, basketball and volleyball
Vigorous –intensity aerobic
  • Active games involving running and chasing, such as tag
  • Bicycle riding
  • Jumping rope
  • Martial arts, such as karate
  • Running
  • Sports such as ice or field hockey, basketball, swimming, tennis or gymnastics
  • Active games involving running and chasing, such as flag football, soccer
  • Bicycle riding
  • Jumping rope
  • Martial arts such as karate
  • Running
  • Sports such as tennis, ice or field hockey, basketball, swimming
  • Vigorous dancing
  • Aerobics
  • Cheerleading or gymnastics
Muscle-strengthening
  • Games such as tug of war
  • Modified push-ups (with knees on the floor)
  • Resistance exercises using body weight or resistance bands
  • Rope or tree climbing
  • Sit-ups
  • Swinging on playground equipment/bars
  • Gymnastics
  • Games such as tug of war
  • Push-ups
  • Resistance exercises with exercise bands, weight machines, hand-held weights
  • Rock climbing
  • Sit-ups
  • Cheerleading or Gymnastics
Bone-strengthening
  • Games such as hop-scotch
  • Hopping, skipping, jumping
  • Jumping rope
  • Running
  • Sports such as gymnastics, basketball, volleyball, tennis
  • Hopping, skipping, jumping
  • Jumping rope
  • Running
  • Sports such as gymnastics, basketball, volleyball, tennis
 
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